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Birds

  • If your pet had an emergency crisis, how would you manage it? Ask your veterinary hospital how they handle after-hour emergencies. Use this handout to help you plan ahead and be prepared in the event of a pet-health emergency.

  • Hydroxyzine is given by mouth or injection and is used off label to treat allergic or itchy conditions. Give as directed. The most common side effect is sedation. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or cetirizine, or pets that have heart failure, urinary obstruction, or stomach obstruction. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Contrary to popular belief, pet birds not raised with other birds typically bond to their owners and are unlikely to want to live with another new bird. If you feel your bird is lonely or bored, first consider providing more enrichment in the form of safe toys and entertainment. If you decide you want to introduce another bird into your household, be sure you are ready to take on the work of caring for more than one bird and be certain to introduce him slowly. All new birds should be checked by a veterinarian before exposing the original bird to a new one, and the new bird should be quarantined in a separate, isolated room within the house for 30-45 days. Some birds never accept new birds in their territories. Consult your veterinarian if you are experiencing problems.

  • Itraconazole is given by mouth in the form of a capsule, tablet, or liquid to treat fungal infections in cats and for off label treatment in dogs and small mammals. The most common side effects are anorexia, vomiting, liver toxicity, skin lesions, or limb and vessel swelling. It should not be used in pets with liver disease or low stomach acid production, and used with caution in pregnant, lactating, or pets with heart disease. If a negative reaction occurs, call your veterinary office.

  • Ketoprofen is given by mouth or injection and is used on and off label to treat pain and inflammation in many animal species. Give this medication as directed by your veterinarian. Common side effects include gastrointestinal upset such as vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other NSAIDS, in horses used for breeding, or in pets using other NSAIDs. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Kidneys are paired organs in the abdomen that filter the waste products of metabolism from the blood for excretion from the body. They are also important in maintaining water and electrolyte balance in the body.

  • Knemidocoptes is a type of bird mite that typically effects canaries, cockatiels and parakeets. It is commonly referred to as scaly face and leg disease. Specific antiparasitic drugs will be prescribed by a veterinarian to treat this disease.

  • Lead is a common household hazard for birds. Due to their curious, explorative nature, house birds can be exposed to lead around the house. Lead causes heavy metal toxicity, affecting the blood, nervous system, and gastrointestinal system. Lead poisoning can be fatal if not treated.

  • Leg bands are used as a form of identification for some pet birds. They are typically placed on the bird's foot when it is a baby. Leg bands may get caught in the cage , on toys or on fabric causing serious damage to the foot or leg.

  • Lincomycin is given by mouth or injection and is used on and off label to treat certain bacterial infections. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Common side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, or drooling. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or similar drugs, in pets with a candida fungal infection, very young pets, or in rabbits, hamsters, guinea pigs, or horses. If a negative reaction occurs, please call the veterinary office.